Comments for What's That Picture? http://www.whatsthatpicture.com Giving old photos new life Wed, 16 Jul 2014 19:53:05 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.2 Comment on Ealing’s Victorian photographic studios and early photographers by John Hutchins http://www.whatsthatpicture.com/2012/01/early-ealing-studios-photographers#comment-21030 Wed, 16 Jul 2014 19:53:05 +0000 http://www.whatsthatpicture.com/?p=741#comment-21030 It’s not the one with a pet fox in it, by any chance?

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Comment on Ealing’s Victorian photographic studios and early photographers by John Hutchins http://www.whatsthatpicture.com/2012/01/early-ealing-studios-photographers#comment-21029 Wed, 16 Jul 2014 19:49:18 +0000 http://www.whatsthatpicture.com/?p=741#comment-21029 My apologies – the one at Pulham was George Hamilton Wakefield – Frank’s son I think.

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Comment on Ealing’s Victorian photographic studios and early photographers by John Hutchins http://www.whatsthatpicture.com/2012/01/early-ealing-studios-photographers#comment-21011 Tue, 15 Jul 2014 21:42:59 +0000 http://www.whatsthatpicture.com/?p=741#comment-21011 The RAF link – or Royal Flying Corp as it was then – is that Frank Wakefield was the official photographer – largely based at Pulham St Mary in Norfolk with the airships and instrumental in photographing downed German dirigibles so that the British could copy them. We don’t know what happened to the original plates – I assume the then Ministry of War may have passed them to Imperial War Museum – but airship enthusiasts have not located any. We have first generation prints that my sister rescued after my father’s death. But I know when we moved temporarily from Ealing to Brighton in 1973, a lot of stuff from our loft in Ealing was dumped as its value was not realised and no one was interested back then. you might be interested in this news item.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-norfolk-17644795

In case you’re wondering, yes, we are Wakefield descendants!!

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Comment on Ealing’s Victorian photographic studios and early photographers by Bob Gray http://www.whatsthatpicture.com/2012/01/early-ealing-studios-photographers#comment-19955 Fri, 20 Jun 2014 12:09:29 +0000 http://www.whatsthatpicture.com/?p=741#comment-19955 I have found a James Paul Harris Gillard who was a Photographic Plate Manufacturer -Plate Testing Department resident at 25 Lindfield Road, Ealing, Middlesex in 1911. Do you know anything about him ?
Also B.J. Edwards & Co. Ltd, Company Address: Castle Bar Works. Ealing Dean.
I am researching Essex Photographers and wish you well with your project.

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Comment on Nurse Margaret Ripley’s WW1 postcard album by Peter Jones http://www.whatsthatpicture.com/in-focus/nurse-margaret-ripleys-ww1-postcard-album#comment-19082 Tue, 27 May 2014 11:18:00 +0000 http://www.whatsthatpicture.com#comment-19082 I have an academic interest in the French Flag Nursing Corps and I would be very interested to find out more about these postcards. Not least about the latter days of her (it appears not very happy) stay with the French Flag Nursing Corps. I would be very grateful to learn more.

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Comment on Ealing’s Victorian photographic studios and early photographers by Enid Hancock http://www.whatsthatpicture.com/2012/01/early-ealing-studios-photographers#comment-18972 Sat, 24 May 2014 19:34:37 +0000 http://www.whatsthatpicture.com/?p=741#comment-18972 Raines photographic Studio had a premise in St Marys Road Ealing opposite the old Ealing Technical College. I remember it well. I had an Aunt who used to work there delivering printed photos to various shops i the area

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Comment on Ealing’s Victorian photographic studios and early photographers by Guy Griffiths http://www.whatsthatpicture.com/2012/01/early-ealing-studios-photographers#comment-14493 Tue, 17 Dec 2013 16:08:21 +0000 http://www.whatsthatpicture.com/?p=741#comment-14493 Hello, we have a Garrett and Aitkinson halftone printing block depicting a biblical image of Revelations 3:20 measuring 105mmx55 and 2 x G&A illustration blocks measuring 5mmx3mm which seem to have been used to print small frames probably around portraits – we’ve been trying to find out a bit more about their history, what they’re worth and where the best place to sell them would be – is this something you might be able to help with? Many thanks, Guy

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Comment on Ealing’s Victorian photographic studios and early photographers by Andy Johnson http://www.whatsthatpicture.com/2012/01/early-ealing-studios-photographers#comment-13023 Wed, 23 Oct 2013 21:00:27 +0000 http://www.whatsthatpicture.com/?p=741#comment-13023 Thanks for sharing this information. Really interesting post!

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Comment on Nurse Margaret Ripley’s WW1 postcard album by Bernard Lewis http://www.whatsthatpicture.com/in-focus/nurse-margaret-ripleys-ww1-postcard-album#comment-12953 Fri, 18 Oct 2013 22:52:20 +0000 http://www.whatsthatpicture.com#comment-12953 Re the image of nurses at Parc Wern – would I be able to copy that please for inclusion in a book I am writing called ‘Swansea in the Great War’? If I can track down more info on Nurse Ripley it might be useful if I could reproduce a few other of the cards to help illustrate the story.

Best wishes,

Bernard (Lewis)

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Comment on Respecting copyright of old photographs – the good, the bad, and the ugly by James http://www.whatsthatpicture.com/2012/09/respecting-copyright-old-photographs#comment-12855 Fri, 11 Oct 2013 12:20:52 +0000 http://www.whatsthatpicture.com/?p=823#comment-12855 And one more thing I wanted to specifically address from Nick’s comment

“I would have no hesitation in crediting the photographer if he were known, but not someone who has merely found the photos and stuck them on a website. If that is the case then it’s just pot luck who finds some old photo and then makes claims on it.”

This make it sound like it’s just a bunch of people grabbing the first thing they see and shoving a distorted shaky photograph on Instagram. But what about someone who has spent years understanding a subject, has developed a keen instinct for tracking down specific images, and has the ability (and time) to rummage through a box of endless photographs to find one gem that is of particular historical interest? They pay a reasonable amount of money for it. They then scan it using expensive equipment to a high quality based on skills that they have learnt, and share it at high resolution because there are details in the image that they know it will be valuable for people to see. Is it then fair that a commercial company comes along and grabs that image, stick it on their website with no attribution, and sells prints of it?

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